Finding New New Literacies Tools – Week 14 Response to Chosen Text

*THIS POST IS PART OF A CONTINUING SERIES OF RESPONSES TO SCHOLARLY TEXTS FOR LEARNING WITH DIGITAL STORIES, A MASTER LEVEL COURSE I AM ENROLLED IN AT UC DENVER.

Comics are awesome tools for promoting new literacies in the classroom – I have found plenty of evidence in the form of scholarly text this semester that support that stance. I feel that the application of comics in the classroom for students to read is natural and something that I have already implemented throughout my teaching practice. What I have found is that I don’t have a grasp of yet is bringing comics into my practice for writing. I have always supported students that want to turn work or narratives into comics but this generally occurs when the students already see themselves as artist and are drawn to illustrating. I have evolved my thinking about teaching  comics as being most beneficial in a classroom for just reluctant readers but for the whole class  and have been looking for ways to open the options for writing comics for students that are not just “artists”. I found a EdTechReview article that highlights an intriguing web 2.0 storyboarding/digital comic tool – StoryboardThat.com.

 

I am excited to find a tool like this for two reasons, one I want to find a user friendly tool for students to use to create new literacy projects and two I want find tools that will fit my focus of graphic novels and can use with my final digital story for my master class.  A few weeks back I did some research into crafting reviews of books for the same reasons and have been more critical of other reviews that I have read. The EdTechReview gives a nice overview of the this tool and provides useful analysis of how to use this tool in the classroom with children. Both as a tool for delivering content and for students to use in their creation of narratives. EdTech also does a great job of providing practical information about StoryboardThat by including pricing plans and a walkthrough for setting up an account and launching a comic strip.
Finally this article’s final recommendation was particularly well crafted. The author not only told me that this is a powerful and user-friendly tool but connected it to my classroom practice by highlighting specific competencies that this tool could be used to support. I am looking forward to experimenting with StoryboardThat with my own digital story and determining how I might use this tool in my practice.

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Finding New New Literacies Tools – Week 14 Response to Chosen Text

5 thoughts on “Finding New New Literacies Tools – Week 14 Response to Chosen Text

  1. I’ve seen some of our teachers use a storyboard template for creating their response to reading, as well as, creative writing. Some struggled, but once they caught on from some really nice student examples, it became easier for them. Thanks for sharing! You’ll have to post some of the student work!

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  2. saraherkes says:

    Hi Darren, thanks for sharing! This is a really interesting took and yet another way that one can produce a digital story. What age group do you think this would work with best?

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    1. I think you could use StoryBoardThat for all ages. For the youngest kiddos I would use the tool to create partially made comics that students could complete on paper. Then with more experience let them use the online editing tools for different partially made comics, and finally letting them create on their own.

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    1. The online subscription for teachers is awesome in that it lets the teacher download student work in multiple ways – a PowerPoint presentation, PDFs of each panel, or a PDF of the whole storyboard. This easily lets the user share storyboards on multiple platforms – such as google classroom or student social media forums like edmodo. For example I created a how to get a library card storyboard and uploaded it to my graphic novel librarian website – http://gnlibrarian.wix.com/home#!library-information/c1pz

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