What’s Your Genre? – week 11 digital story critique

*THIS POST BELONGS TO A COLLECTION OF CRITIQUES OF DIGITAL COMICS AND RELATED MATERIAL, CREATED FOR A MASTER LEVER COURSE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER.

This means that people who have an interest in comics finally have a storefront that sells them something besides Punchman Adventures #45 (Part 5 of the 13-Part Crosstime Punchfest Spectacular)

I have been developing a podcast, or vlog, or YouTube video series (not sure which one yet) to use as a digital storytelling project for my masters class. What I want to do with the series is threefold, first I want to review the graphic novels I have been reading, second I want to take inquiries from my viewers for graphic novel, comics or digital comic suggestions, they should be read based on their hobbies, and interests or preferences in literature and entertainment and finally I what to highlight the spectacular collection, in both in print and ebooks, available at the Denver Public Library.

To prepare to give reading suggestions to my nonexistent viewership I have been looking into expanding my own horizons in the genres of graphic novels that I am reading. While doing this research I found a very interesting Thought Bubble column on ComicAlliance.com titled What is the Future of Non-Superhero Comics. Author, Matt D. Wilson, asks this question to five comic creators shares their insights.  I am going to critique this column using:

  • Story
  • Sense of Audience
  • Research

Story

The general consensus from the writers is that the digital environment is helping the genres of comics be able to diversify. This is happening in two ways. First digital comics that can be produced with low overhead giving creators opportunities to create and publish the stories that interest them, not what the corporate comic publisher see as viable. Next the digital comic book stores provides the consumer of comics greater access to these new comic genres, both digital and traditional, because in the virtual world shelf space is not limited to proven titles, unlike brick and mortar comic book shops are forced to only sell proven titles to stay afloat. This message is presented without any comment by the author and does not need it because the authoritative voices from the five comic creators.

Sense of Audience

Like comics themselves ComicAliance.com’s content is dominated by the superhero genre and the audience of the sight, comic book readers, have ample experience with this genre.  The readers of this particular column are looking for something new because they feel the comic book media has become stale because of the dominance of superhero titles.  The comments and message of this column reaches that audience nicely and provide an optimistic message and suggestions for many titles that are not the standard superhero fare.

Research

This columns strength is that Wilson found interesting interviewees with interesting points to share. The comic creators Wilson accessed are experienced with both creating comics that fall outside of the superhero genre and have connections to the world of digital comics. Kevin Church, especially, who I quoted at the beginning of this blog, was able to use humor and compelling evidence to support his claims and make the reader excited for a bold new world of comic genre.

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What’s Your Genre? – week 11 digital story critique

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